Finally, instead of giving China and India a passport to pollution, as Trump asserts, the pact is the first time these two major developing countries have agreed on concrete and ambitious climate commitments. The two countries, which are already poised to be world leaders in renewable energy, have made considerable progress in achieving their Paris goals. And since Trump announced his intention to withdraw the United States from the agreement, the Chinese and Indian leaders have reaffirmed their commitment and continued to implement domestic policies to achieve their goals. Unlike the Kyoto Protocol, which set legally binding emission reduction targets (as well as penalties for non-compliance) only for industrialized countries, the Paris Agreement requires all countries – rich, poor, developed and developing – to take their share and reduce their greenhouse gas emissions. To this end, the Paris Agreement provides for greater flexibility: commitments that countries should make are not included, countries can voluntarily set their emissions targets and countries will not be penalized if they do not meet their proposed targets. But what the Paris agreement requires is to monitor, report and reassess, over time, the objectives of individual and collective countries, in order to bring the world closer to the broader objectives of the agreement. And the agreement stipulates that countries must announce their next round of targets every five years, contrary to the Kyoto Protocol, which was aimed at this target but which contained no specific requirements to achieve this goal. At the 2015 Paris conference, at which the agreement was negotiated, developed countries reaffirmed their commitment to mobilize $100 billion a year to finance climate by 2020 and agreed to continue mobilizing $100 billion a year by 2025. [48] The commitment refers to the existing plan to allocate $100 billion per year to developing countries for climate change adaptation and climate change mitigation.

[49] « The decision to leave the Paris Agreement was wrong when it was announced and it is still wrong today, » said Helen Mountford of the World Resources Institute. The EU and its member states are among the nearly 190 parties to the Paris Agreement.